Rice 101
Rice Types
Rice History
Rice Products
Healthy Diet
Gluten Free
Brown Rice
Dairy Alternative
How It's Made

Brown Rice

Whole Grain Goodness. Delicious Taste.

Brown rice is one of the world’s healthiest foods. Isn’t that amazing to hear?! Because only the hard, inedible hull is removed from brown rice, the bran and fatty acids are left intact and these are essential elements for helping you achieve optimal health.

Many people prefer white rice because of its softer texture and the misconceived notion that it is somehow more difficult to make brown rice. It is true, brown rice does take a bit more time to prepare since water needs to penetrate the outer bran layers in order to soften the grain, but the nutritional benefits of brown rice make up for the longer prep-time, tenfold.

Fortunately, we are recognizing a more widespread appreciation for the healthy qualities of brown rice, in addition to its chewier texture and wonderful nutty taste. Brown rice is a delicious addition to many meals and is a suitable, if not, encouraged, substitute for white rice.

All of our rice products are available in both white and brown varieties.

Brown rice is an excellent food to help keep your body healthy.

Rice has the following nutritional benefits:

  • Excellent source of carbohydrates
  • Good energy source
  • Low fat
  • Low salt
  • No cholesterol
  • Low sugar
  • No gluten
  • No additives
  • No preservatives

Rice supplies half of the daily calories for half of the world’s population. In fact, in some parts of the world, the words, “to eat”, literally mean, “to eat rice”.

When brown rice is milled and polished to produce white kernels, 67% of vitamin B3, 80% of vitamin B1, 90% of vitamin B6, half of the manganese, half of the phosphorus, 60% of the iron, and all of the dietary fibre and essential fatty acids are removed.

One cup of brown rice provides 88% of the daily supply of manganese. Manganese helps produce energy from protein and carbohydrates and is involved in the synthesis of fatty acids, which are important to a healthy nervous system. Manganese is a critical component of the important antioxidant enzyme called superoxide dismutase (SOD).

Incorporating whole grains into your diet can even help you lose weight. Those consuming the most dietary fibre from whole grains were 49% less likely to gain weight compared to those eating foods from refined grains.

Plant lignans are found in whole grains, including brown rice. Plant lignans are converted into mammalian lignans by friendly flora in our intestines, one of which is called enterolactone. Enterolactone is thought to protect against breast and other hormone-dependent cancers as well as heart disease.

Magnesium is rich in whole grains and brown rice and acts as a co-factor for more than 300 enzymes, including enzymes involved in the body’s use of glucose and insulin secretion. This can substantially lower the risk of type 2 diabetes. Magnesium also works to balance the action of calcium, thereby regulating nerve and muscle tone.

Recipes

Smoked Salmon and Wild Rice Soup

Smoked Salmon and Wild Rice Soup

Melt butter in a large saucepan over medium-high heat. When hot, add onions and cook until caramelized, about 10 minutes. Add the celery and continue to cook for several minutes. Continue Reading

Festive Slow Cooker Rice Muesli

Festive Slow Cooker Rice Muesli

A perfect breakfast for entertaining large groups over the holidays, hosts can relax and let people serve themselves. Simply assemble all of the ingredients in the slow cooker before going to bed and forget about it until you're ready for breakfast in the morning. Continue Reading

Apple Pilau

Apple Pilau

A vegetarian diet calls for meals with ingredients that make up for lost proteins found in meats. Protein packed cashews provide added substance to this Indian inspired dish fortified with U.S. basmati rice and apples. Continue Reading