Sticky
Short
Medium
Jasmin
Basmati
Brown
Organic
Sweet
Wild

Kokuho (8 KG)

UPC: 0 73234 00318 5

Kokuho (8 KG)
  • Grown in USA
  • GlutenFree

This rice is extremely similar to Kokuho Rose® — it’s just a little less sticky and a little less sweet, and a little less in cost. It is, however, the same fatness.  

Far superior to other Calroses, Kokuho is grown in the U.S. and produces an extremely consistent quality of seed, unlike those grown in other countries. Known to be fussy about rice, the Japanese owned company Nomura oversees all growers and all the mills, which must follow strict guidelines to ensure it is a high-grade Calrose rice; otherwise, it is deemed not deserving of the special Kokuho name. You could say Kokuho Rose® is the crown jewel in our collection, and Kokuho is the crown.

Find this product at:

T&T Supermarket
Walmart

Soaking

Soaking is actually a part of the cooking process and is an essential procedure when cooking sticky rice, as it relaxes the grain.

Medium Grain/Sushi Rice

This rice needs to be soaked for 20 minutes to relax the grain. Use one part rice to 1 1/8 part of water. Bring water to a boil, then reduce heat and cook, covered, for 10 minutes or until done.

Brown Rice

Brown rice is just as easy as white! Try soaking the amount of brown rice called for in the recipe for 10 to 15 minutes prior to cooking.

Always follow package directions. If directions are not available, use this method:

Stovetop

1 cup uncooked brown rice

2 to 2 1/2 cups liquid (water, broth, juice)

1 tsp butter, margarine, or oil (optional)

Method: Combine ingredients in 2- to 3-quart saucepan. Bring to boil; stir. Reduce heat, cover, and simmer 45 to 50 minutes, or until rice is tender and liquid is absorbed. Fluff with a fork.

Sushi Rice

Begin by rinsing the rice for more sticky results. The ratio of rice to water is 2:1. Try cooking 1 cup of rice with 2 cups of water. If you can, let your rice and water sit for about 20 to 30 minutes before you cook it. You may find you get better results this way. If you don’t have a rice cooker, a saucepan with a good lid will work just fine. If you’re doing it that way, follow these steps:

  • Bring rice and water to a boil
  • Reduce heat to a simmer
  • Cover rice and water, and allow to cook for 20 minutes
  • Turn off heat and allow rice to steam for 10 minutes

While your rice is cooking, make your sushi vinegar. The below ingredients are for 2 cups of uncooked rice:

  • 1/4 cup rice vinegar
  • 2 tbsp sugar
  • 1 tsp salt

Combine these ingredients in a small saucepan or microwave and heat them until the salt and sugar are dissolved. The idea behind the sugar is to lessen the tartness of the vinegar; the salt brings out the flavour of the vinegar while reducing the sweetness. Once your rice is cooked, place your rice in a rice-cooling bowl, for example a large casserole dish. Evenly sprinkle your sushi vinegar mix over your rice and, using a wooden spoon or spatula, mix the rice and vinegar well. (Try to avoid using metal, as it will change the flavour of the rice.) Be careful not to break the kernels of the rice or to flatten the rice or it won’t have the same look and feel to it. Once it’s well mixed, using a fan or a plate, fan the rice down to room temperature. By doing this, the rice will have the right glossy look while still being nice and sticky. If you don’t fan it, the rice’s hull won't remain as intact and kernels will break when you use it. At this point, your rice is ready to use.

 

Serving size 45g
Amount Per Serving
Calories 160
% Daily Value*
Fat 0g 0%
Saturated 0g 0%
Cholesterol 0mg
Sodium 0mg 0%
Carbohydrate 36g 13%
Fibre 0g 0%
Sugars 0g
Protein 3g
Vitamin A 0%
Vitamin C 0%
Calcium 0%
Iron 4%

Glycemic Index

GI stands for Glycemic Index and is a measure of the impact of food on your blood sugar. Foods with a high GI tend to quickly raise your body’s blood sugar levels; by contrast, foods with a low GI will raise them more slowly and over a longer period.

The glycemic index range is as follows:

Low GI = 55 or less
Medium GI = 56–69
High GI = 70 or more


All GI figures are based on studies conducted at the University of Sydney. Consult a dietician for specific healthcare information.

GI Score
72

Glycemic Index

GI stands for Glycemic Index and is a measure of the impact of food on your blood sugar. Foods with a high GI tend to quickly raise your body’s blood sugar levels; by contrast, foods with a low GI will raise them more slowly and over a longer period.

The glycemic index range is as follows:

Low GI = 55 or less
Medium GI = 56–69
High GI = 70 or more


All GI figures are based on studies conducted at the University of Sydney. Consult a dietician for specific healthcare information.

GI Score 72

Recipes: