Rice 101
Rice Types
Rice History
Rice Products
Healthy Diet
Gluten Free
Brown Rice
Dairy Alternative
How It's Made

Nature's Perfect Whole Food

A gluten-free diet is required for those suffering from of Celiac Disease (CD), Dermatitis Herpetiformis (DH) and recommended for those with wheat allergies, and/or those who are sensitive to the gliadin protein in gluten. This diet is completely free of ingredients derived from grains and cereals containing gluten: wheat (including kamut and spelt), barley, and rye as well as the inclusion of gluten as a food additive in the form of a flavoring, stabilizing or thickening agent. 
CD is a lifelong genetic disorder that can affect both children and adults. When people with CD consume foods containing gluten, it creates an immune-mediated toxic reaction that causes damage to the small intestine. This does not allow food to be properly absorbed. Even small amounts of gluten in foods can affect those with CD and cause health problems. Damage can occur to the small bowel even when there are no symptoms present. Celiac Disease has no cure, but avoiding the consumption of gluten can resolve its symptoms, mitigate and possibly reverse damage, and reduce associated health risks.
Not all adverse reactions are due to Celiac Disease.  The gluten-sensitive designation may not be appropriate in all cases, as wheat allergies are often directed toward albumins or globulins of wheat, or the person may have a sensitivity to proteins commonly found with wheat products (e.g. fungal amylase or bread-yeast mannins).
Lactose intolerance, food sensitivities or allergies to soy, corn, other foods or even the stomach flu, are common causes of symptoms similar to CD.
Consult your physician or dietician for more information regarding CD, wheat allergies, and gluten sensitivity.

Rice and its derivatives do not contain gluten.

Gluten is the generic name for certain types of sticky storage proteins contained in the common cereal grains wheat, barley, rye and their derivatives. 

A gluten-free diet is required for those suffering from of Celiac Disease (CD), Dermatitis Herpetiformis (DH) and recommended for those with wheat allergies, and/or those who are sensitive to the gliadin protein in gluten. This diet is completely free of ingredients derived from grains and cereals containing gluten: wheat (including kamut and spelt), barley, and rye as well as the inclusion of gluten as a food additive in the form of a flavoring, stabilizing or thickening agent. 

CD is a lifelong genetic disorder that can affect both children and adults. When people with CD consume foods containing gluten, it creates an immune-mediated toxic reaction that causes damage to the small intestine. This does not allow food to be properly absorbed. Even small amounts of gluten in foods can affect those with CD and cause health problems. Damage can occur to the small bowel even when there are no symptoms present. Celiac Disease has no cure, but avoiding the consumption of gluten can resolve its symptoms, mitigate and possibly reverse damage, and reduce associated health risks.

Not all adverse reactions are due to Celiac Disease. The gluten-sensitive designation may not be appropriate in all cases, as wheat allergies are often directed toward albumins or globulins of wheat, or the person may have a sensitivity to proteins commonly found with wheat products (e.g. fungal amylase or bread-yeast mannins).

Lactose intolerance, food sensitivities or allergies to soy, corn, other foods or even the stomach flu, are common causes of symptoms similar to CD.

Consult your physician or dietician for more information regarding CD, wheat allergies, and gluten sensitivity.

Related Content: www.celiac.org, www.aocd.org

Recipes

Sky High Chicken and Vegetable Pie

Sky High Chicken and Vegetable Pie

Canada's Guide to Healthy Eating translates the science of eating well into a practical pattern of food choices that meets nutrient needs, promotes health and minimizes the risk of chronic diseases. This savoury pie recipe makes getting the recommended meats, dairy products, vegetables and grains easy by cleverly including all food groups in a rice crust. Continue Reading

How to Make Sushi

How to Make Sushi

Do you love sushi? We are lucky to have a plethora of excellent sushi restaurants to choose from. But have you ever thought about making your own? What might seem intimidating is actually not that difficult, and you’ll probably find it to be a lot of fun. The key is to make sure beforehand that you have the necessary equipment and ingredients. <p> Sushi can be enjoyed in many different ways. Sushi prepared as rice rolls wrapped in nori (a thin slice of dried seaweed) is called Maki sushi. Some kinds of Maki sushi are Futo Maki (“fat rolls”, usually with vegetable and egg centres), Tekka Maki (with raw salmon or tuna centres), and Kappa Maki (made with vegetable centres, e.g. cucumber sticks). <p> Sushi that is a fish slice on a palm full of rice is known as Nigiri Sushi. If the raw fish is served alone, it is called Sashimi.</p> <p> Today we’ll be making a style of Maki Sushi.</p> Continue Reading

Thai Rib Eye and Rice Dinner

Thai Rib Eye and Rice Dinner

Give your dad a different kind of tie for Father's Day... the edible kind. Marinated rib eye, rice with grilled shiitake mushrooms and red curry flavoured green beans puts your average steak and potato dinner to shame. Crowd pleasing and easily done at home, cook your dad a Thai dinner in a more intimate setting...his own backyard! Continue Reading